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Archeological Reminiscence of Millet's Angelus, 1933-1935

Artwork Details

Title
Archeological Reminiscence of Millet's Angelus

Maker
Salvador Dalí
Date Made
c.1934
Place Made
Spain
Materials
Oil on panel
Dimensions
image: 12 1/2 in x 15 1/2 in
Accession ID Number
2000.5
Credit Line
Gift of A. Reynolds & Eleanor Morse
Location
ON VIEW
Copyright
Worldwide rights ©Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí (Artists Rights Society), 2017 / In the USA ©Salvador Dalí Museum, Inc. St. Petersburg, FL 2017.
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Supplemental material

Description

The artist visualized the Angelus couple from the painting by Jean-François Millet. As a result of his memories, Dalí paints the figures as ancient towers on the moonlit Ampurdan plain, an atmosphere charged with an eerie, prehistoric quality. In his essay on Millet’s work, Dalí uses a postcard to illustrate how the bowing figures reminded him of the monoliths (menhirs) he saw in parts of Catalonia.

Dalí paints the female slightly taller than the male, with her features resembling a praying mantis. In his analysis of the painting’s latent meaning, Dalí felt that the female was not only the dominant partner, but also posed a sexual threat to the male, associating her with a female praying mantis. This alludes to Dalí’s assertion that Millet’s painting represents sexual repression, male fear and impotence, and in his work Dalí has updated the popular 19th century Symbolist tradition of the femme fatale into a Surrealist context, extending the message of the implicit dangers of female sensuality.

Exhibition History:
1934, Paris, Jacques Bonjean, “Exposition Dali”
1934, New York, Julien Levy Gallery, “Dali”
1946, Boston, The Institute of Modern Art, Four Spaniards : Dali, Gris, Miro, Picasso
1947, Cleveland, Cleveland Museum of Art, “Print Club of Cleveland-Salvador Dalí: An Exhibition”
1965, New York, Gallery of Modern Art, “Salvador Dalí, 1910-1965”
1996, Barcelona, La Pedrera, “Dalí. Arquitectura”
1996, Barcelona, Fundacio Caixa de Catalunya, “Dalí. Arquitectura”
1998, Liverpool, Tate Gallery, “Dali: A Mythology”
1999, Fukuoka, Fukuoka Asian Art Museum, "Dali Exhibition 1999"
1999, Shinjuku(Tokyo), Mitsukoshi Museum of Art, "Dali Exhibition 1999"
2004, Madrid, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, “Dalí. Cultura de masses”
2004, Barcelona, CaixaForum, “Dalí. Cultura de masses”
2005, Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, “Salvador Dalí and Mass Culture”
2005, St. Petersburg, Salvador Dalí Museum, “Salvador Dalí and Mass Culture”
2006, Tokyo, Ueno Royal Museum, “Dalí Centennial Retrospective”
2009, Melbourne, National Gallery of Victoria, "Salvador Dalí : Liquid Desire"
2015, San Francisco, Walt Disney Family Museum, "Disney and Dali: Architects of the Imagination"
2016, St. Petersburg, Salvador Dali Museum, "Disney and Dali: Architects of the Imagination"

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